What are some of the most useful points, tricks and tips to be aware of when installing surveillance systems? Find out below!

  • Switch from analog – the earliest CCTV cameras were basically analog (they had a closed circuit) had distinct features: their records were low-quality reproductions that were often monochrome or tinted in one specific colour (i.e. green or orange for example). They performed their functions in the most basic way possible to put it bluntly. However, nowadays, with the introduction of comparatively better recording technologies such as 1080p and 4K definitions, the quality that these cameras can reproduce has definitely improved. Accordingly, most of the world has already made the switch from analog cameras to the newer digital cameras in the surveillance department: the basic setup today is at least a 480p or 720p definition in full colour. Consider this fact before purchasing your cameras.
  • Mistakes during cabling – if you had not considered the above point before surveillance camera installation Melbourne – or worse, if you had not considered any differences between cameras – there are chances that you might have made a mistake during cabling. Basically, this relates to the nature of the cables: analog cameras worked with coaxial cables known as a ‘Siamese cables’, whereas the modern-day IP cameras (basically, the digital cameras which transmit live feeds and records through the internet) work with CAT6 and CAT5 cables. If you are installing the surveillance systems on your own, it is quite easy to make a mistake and buy the typical Siamese cables. But do not worry – you can buy converters (called a ‘balun’) to fit on both ends of your cables to make them compatible with digital cameras.
  • Save up on storage space – the improvements in recording quality has also one particular downside to them: the increased size of the records. Analog cameras had the advantage of requiring very little space regardless of the fact that they operated for twenty-hours a day, every week. However, with the modern-day camera systems, you can easily expect anywhere between fifty gigabytes and hundred gigabytes for a single day of recording! For example, a camera operating at 720p, on a 30 frame rate per second, with a 2MP lens would take around 70 gigabytes for 24 hours – totalling to 500 gigabytes by the end of the week! While you can have a bigger hard drive (anywhere from 15 to 20 terabytes), you will still need to attend to their drives frequently. Instead, you can tweak the camera settings to reduce the frame rate to 15 per second, and have the cameras record only when motion is observed on them: this combination can easily decrease their daily file sizes to 10-20 gigabytes.